Meet the England’s Creative Coast artists

Seven international contemporary artists have been commissioned by England’s Creative Coast to create a series of new  artworks across Kent, Essex and East Sussex.

Waterfronts, curated by Tamsin Dillon, invites these artists to consider the coastline as the physical and the political border between the land and its surrounding waters. Each artwork will respond to a different site along this distinctive coastline, to its histories, stories and distinctive features, as well as asking questions about the issues facing this border, now and in the future. The artworks will launch throughout 2020 and are created in collaboration with our cultural partners.

Meet the artists…

Michael Rakowitz (b.1973, New York. Lives and works in Chicago)
Margate, with Turner Contemporary

Rakowitz’s practice draws on the histories of buildings and objects, frequently revealing stories and connections between people and places from different times and places. For Waterfronts, he will focus on connecting the social and geological histories of Margate.

“There are many things that interest and excite me about the prospect of making a site-specific work in Margate. The history of poets and rescuers looking out at the sea for inspiration and life has informed my project, as has the fossil bearing rock of the coast, which reminds me that stone is an archive. But I am also led by urgency, of understanding what it means to be at the edge of a place, where hospitality and hostility mix.”

Michael Rakowitz, The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist, 2020

Michael Rakowitz, The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist, 2020

Mariana Castillo Deball (b.1975, Mexico City, Mexico. Lives and works in Berlin, Germany)
Eastbourne, with Towner Art Gallery

Deball’s diverse, kaleidoscopic practice combines visual art with archaeology, science and history to make installations, performances, sculptures and text-based pieces. She focuses on different forms and languages to reveal the role of objects and stories in our histories and identities. For Waterfronts, she will draw on both the ancient and more recent geological and social history of the area.

Mariana Castillo Deball, TO-DAY July 9th, 2016. Infinite Staircase Structure installed on a public space at Liverpool 1

Mariana Castillo Deball, TO-DAY July 9th, 2016. Infinite Staircase Structure installed on a public space at Liverpool 1

Holly Hendry (b.1990, London. Lives and works in London)
Bexhill-on-Sea, with De La Warr Pavilion

Hendry makes sculptures and installations that give physical form to ideas around emptiness, edges, absence, flatness, fakes and forgeries, using a variety of materials, from Jesmonite and plaster to foam, wood, steel and water-jet cut marble. For Bexhill she will investigate the precise boundary between land and water and the impact on one by the other.

“Bexhill-on-Sea’s geographical, archaeological and social positioning is an exciting and complex location to consider the idea of uncertain edges.”

Cenotaph, 2018, Jesmonite, concrete, oak, marble, stainless steel, Liverpool Biennial 2018. Photo credits - Pete Carr/ Thierry Bal

Cenotaph, 2018, Jesmonite, concrete, oak, marble, stainless steel, Liverpool Biennial 2018. Photo credits – Pete Carr/ Thierry Bal

Andreas Angelidakis (b. 1968, Athens, Greece. Lives and works in Athens)
Hastings, with Hastings Contemporary

Angelidakis’ work investigates the passing of time, attempting to make sense of where we are and how we got here. Originally trained as an architect,, his work emerges from the experience of being in place: in architecture, in psychoanalysis, in the internet, in a body, within climate change. His work for Hastings will draw on these broad parameters to consider the state of the place and what its future might be.

“Standing on a beach, like Hastings, is the perfect spot to look out to what the future brings, to look out to the horizon”.

Andreas Angelidakis, Polemos. Photo Nils Klinger. Courtesy the Breeder

Andreas Angelidakis, Polemos. Photo Nils Klinger. Courtesy the Breeder

Pilar Quinteros (b.1988 Santiago, Chile. Lives and works in Santiago, Chile)
Folkestone, with Creative Folkestone, as part of Folkestone Triennial 2020

Quinteros’ work is underpinned by an abiding interest in public spaces, the way they function and the diversity of human behaviour within them. She experiments with both structure and material, and testing the boundaries, resilience and resistance of fragile and unstable materials. In Folkestone she will test her practice to create a new multi-faceted work.

 “Working for Folkestone makes me think of that region of the country and its history being an important border, as a place of simultaneous entries and exits.”

Pilar Quinteros, Cathedral of Freedom, 2015. Courtesy of the artist

Pilar Quinteros, Cathedral of Freedom, 2015. Courtesy of the artist

Jasleen Kaur (b.1986 Glasgow. Lives and works in London)
Gravesend, with Cement Fields

Kaur’s work reconsiders the realities of materiality, usage and everyday routine within the everyday things that surround us. Her refashioned objects are based on instinct and resourcefulness, reflecting a hybridity of national custom. Her new work will be a response to the connections between the diverse communities in Gravesend.

I Keep Telling Them These Stories 2018

Jasleen Kaur, I Keep Telling Them These Stories (your body as an instrument), 2018

Katrina Palmer (b.1967, London. Lives and works in London)
Southend-on-Sea, with Metal

Palmer works with stories that are distributed across found sites, audio environments, printed matter and performance. Attentive to uncertainties, bodily vulnerabilities and insecure environments, these situated narratives invite the audience to consider how well sculpture might address the intangible. She will explore and investigate the areas in and around Southend-on-Sea and look to reveal the way they are shaped by a cultural, political, emotional and mechanical forces.

“I’ve been given this opportunity when our connections to the continent and to the environment and even a concept of common humanity seem distanced ideals.”

Katrina Palmer, The Coffin Jump. Photo Danny Lawson PA

Katrina Palmer, The Coffin Jump. Photo Danny Lawson PA

Hear some of the artists talk about their approach to their England’s Creative Coast commission.

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